Friday, March 9, 2012

Get Kony 2012

This thirty minute video has been watched by 52 million people since it was uploaded on youtube on Monday. I have been blogging about Kony for many years and have long recognised him as the worlds most evil man. I fully support the #getkony movement and have been irritated by some who are trying their best to find a way to delegitimise it. The objective of the movement is simply to put Kony out of business before the end of the year. The worlds worst terrorists and dictators have been meeting their makers at an astonishing rate of late, either at the hands of Navy Seals or of vengeful masses. Hopefully a similar fate awaits the worlds worst warlords. I will be keeping an eye on this story as it progresses.

13 comments:

builder man said...

Inspirational Stuff! Well done. I'm sending off for my action kit tonight!

Ted Leddy said...

Builder man

A truly worthy cause. And another great example of how the digital age is making life very dificult for those who want to control the masses through brutality.

The System Works said...

Ted: I believe Kony is one of the most evil men walking the African continent. However, the fact that this group 'Invisible Children' supports the Ugandan armed forces and the Sudan People's Liberation Army against the LRA shows startling naivete on their part. I am not comfortable with this campaign. Its CEOs have triumphantly posed for photographs with members of the forces mentioned above, and spend much of their time and money lobbying for other governments to assist them. The Ugandan army has faced serious allegations of war crimes from the UN and the SPLA has also used rape as a tactic to subdue local populations.

This is yet another case of many people putting the heart before the head.

Ted Leddy said...

TSW

The Ugandan Army is the legitimate army of Uganda. They have a bad human rights record as most African counties do. But every country in the world recognises them. Any charity operating in Uganda has to work with them. I'm sure the SPLA are far from saints but I too would support them against the LRA, as I did in their wars against Khartoum.

I don't see how any of this invalidates the movement to make Kony famous in order to bring pressure on everybody and anybody to get him. My understanding of Kony is that his power is based on a mythical belief that he is some Jesus like figure. If he is taken out whether by a US drone, the Ugandan Army or if he ends up in front of the ICC his movement will come to an end.

I rembember thinking a long time ago after I had read something on the LRA that "this guy will never be caught" because the Ugandan army are incompetent and no world power cares about what goes on in Northern Uganda. I didn't imagine that a digital movement like this could emerge to highlight the horror of the LRA and the need to shut Kony down.

The System Works said...

Ted: All armies will face allegations of abuses if engaged in combat for long enough, but with the Ugandan army we are talking about systematic atrocities driven by an unsavoury regime. I agree that the SPLA are superior to the folks in Khartoum.

I hope what you say about Kony is correct, otherwise we might be getting troops involved in an enormous area the size of France, spanning four countries, to bring him and the LRA down. Previous US-backed attempts to 'get Kony' have failed, with brutal reprisal attacks by the LRA as a result. Fighters sent to kill Kony got mutilated. Its not hard to foresee a lot more Mogadishus if western troops get sent in.

builder man said...

I think what may be worrying The System Works is the ICC itself. There
were 7 countries who voted against its establishment: Iraq (Sadaam Hussein), Libya (Gadaafi),China, Qatar, Yemen, Israel and the United
States. By your company are you known. Of course in an imperfect world all manner of dilemmas present
themselves. But this man is responsible for horrendous crimes
and I hope he will be brought to trial rather than be assassinated.
A public accounting is the best way
to progress a civilised world. The
Nurembourg Trials were the precursor for a more civilised Europe. The sooner tribalism, religious or otherwise, is banished, the sooner a more intelligent, tolerant humanity will
emerge.

The System Works said...

builder man: I am opposed to much of what is called international law today and the antics of the Hague.

By the way, this stuff does NOT come from Nuremberg. The Allies prosecuted Nazis as an occupying power under their own legal systems, and categorically refused to establish international tribunals with judges from neutral countries.

The System Works said...

builder man: Daniel Hannan MEP addresses the scam that is modern international law and the Eurocrats very well in this series of videos: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H5VweYqOucU

Ted Leddy said...

TSW

You raise some reasonable points but I think the pros far outweigh the cons. I don't envision a situation where western troops get bogged down. I don't even envision western troops. But Kony's atrcocities have been tolerated for so long because so few people know who he is or what he has done. This movement aims to make him world famous which means pressure will be put on all concerned to get him. This is a good thing. The risks are low.

Gary said...

I am normally opposed to the idea of sending US troops overseas to get involved in the affairs of other countries. I believe we (the US) have been far too engaged in this type of activity since WWII. However, that does not mean I am an isolationist, nor that we should unilaterally disengage or ignore every cry for help. This is a perfect example of what I believe is the right kind of mission and the right way to carry it out.

Kony has been around far too long and far too many have suffered and are living in fear as a result.

Evil must be confronted and stopped. We have sent about 100 Special Forces and technicians with sophisticated communications and monitoring equipment to assist local authorities for the single purpose of destroying the LRA and Kony. That is a good thing. That is the right thing to do.

As for bringing him before an international tribunal to answer for his crimes. I have little faith in the Hague and I believe it takes them far too long to get anything accomplished. Their trails take years and years! Justice delayed is justice denied.

I would prefer to see Kony turned over to whatever country in which he is captured to face justice at their hands -hopefully something slow and painful..... (I know, it's the barbarian in me, but we need at little barbarism sometimes in order to survive against barbarism).

Gary

Ted Leddy said...

Well Said Gary

I think the ICC has merits. They got Charles Taylor of Liberian infamy and have indicted Omar Al Bashir. However for me, the prosecution of justice comes secondary to the number one objective which is putting Kony out of business.

builder man said...

Nuremburg. It was international in the sense that 9 occupying countries
constituted the tribunal and the defendants were tried for violations
of INTERNATIONAL LAW. That paragon of
justice, Josef Stalin, wanted to execute 50 to 100,000 German staff
officers. Churchill, the only member
to have served in the front line of
war, was far more emollient. However
slow the wheels of justice, they grind exceeding small, and is far better than the instant gratification of assassination or worse.To activate any barbarity in the pursuit of justice puts one at the same level as the barbarian. Revenge is always a bad policy because then the retaliation never stops.

Gary said...

Builder man,

I understand what you are saying and you make a good point. But, in this case, I still believe justice is better served by allowing the countries victimized by Kony's brutality to be the deciders of his fate. A tribunal of those 4 countries would be a very good outcome but turning him over to the Hague, while certainly an "acceptable outcome" would degrade and undermine the effectiveness and slow the healing process for his victims.

As for brutality and barbarism, the world has not yet evolved civilization beyond the need to occasionally met force with force, brutality with brutality. We are getting there, certainly, but we are just not there yet.

Gary